Pyotr Tchaikovsky

Eugene Onegin

Mar 30 - Apr 22 Buy Tickets from $34

Tchaikovsky’s setting of Pushkin’s timeless verse novel is presented on the Met stage in Deborah Warner’s moving production, starring Anna Netrebko and Dmitri Hvorostovsky as Tatiana and Onegin. Alexey Dolgov sings the role of Lenski, and Robin Ticciati conducts.

A co-production of the Metropolitan Opera and English National Opera

Read Synopsis
  • Sung In
  • Russian
  • Met Titles In
  • English
  • German
  • Spanish
  • Estimated Run Time
  • 3 hrs 38 mins
  • House Opens
  • Act I 78 mins
  • Intermission 33 mins
  • Act II 44 mins
  • Intermission 25 mins
  • Act III 38 mins
  • Opera Ends
Mar 30 - Apr 22 Buy Tickets from $34

Cast

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Performed
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World premiere: Maly Theater, Moscow, 1879 (student performance). Professional premiere: Bolshoi Theater, 1881. Tchaikovsky’s many moods—tender, grand, melancholy—are all given free rein in Eugene Onegin. The opera is based on Pushkin’s iconic verse novel, which re-imagines the Byronic romantic anti-hero as the definitive bored Russian aristocrat caught between convention and ennui; Tchaikovsky, similarly, took Western European operatic forms and transformed them into an authentic and undeniably Russian work. At the core of the opera is the young girl Tatiana, who grows from a sentimental adolescent into a complete woman in one of the operatic stage’s most convincing character developments.

Creators

Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840–1893) enjoyed tremendous fame during his lifetime as a composer of symphonic music and ballets. His operas have achieved a steadily growing popularity outside of Russia. The libretto for Eugene Onegin was largely put together by the composer himself, with help from his brother Modest (1850–1916) and others. The source of the libretto is the mock-epic verse novel of the same name by Alexander Pushkin (1799–1837), whose position in Russian literature can be compared only to that of Shakespeare in English.

Production Deborah Warner

Set Designer Tom Pye

Costume Designer Chloe Obolensky

Lighting Designer Jean Kalman

Video Designers Ian William Galloway, Finn Ross

Choreographer Kim Brandstrup

Revival Stage Director Paula Williams

Composer

Pyotr Tchaikovsky

Setting

Pushkin presents a vast overview of old Russian society around 1820, which Tchaikovsky’s original score neatly divides into each of its three acts: from the timeless rituals of country life to the rural gentry with its troubles and pleasures and, finally, the glittering imperial aristocracy of St. Petersburg. The Met’s production places the action in the later 19th century, around the time of the opera’s premiere.

Music