Giacomo Puccini

Manon Lescaut

Nov 14 - Dec 10 Buy Tickets from $32

Anna Netrebko and Kristine Opolais share the title role, a heroine as alluring and irresistible as her adored city of Paris. Marcelo Álvarez is her obsessed lover in the opera that made Puccini famous, showcased in Richard Eyre’s heated,1940s film noir–inspired production, with Marco Armiliato on the podium.

Co-production of the Metropolitan Opera and Festival Hall Baden-Baden

Read Synopsis
  • Sung In
  • Italian
  • Met Titles In
  • English
  • German
  • Italian
  • Spanish
  • Estimated Run Time
  • 3 hrs 7 mins
  • House Opens
  • Act I 36 mins
  • Intermission 33 mins
  • Act II 41 mins
  • Intermission 26 mins
  • Act III 51 mins
  • Opera Ends
Nov 14 - Dec 10 Buy Tickets from $32

Cast

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TBA

Performed
Performing
All Dates
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World premiere: Teatro Regio, Turin, 1893. Met premiere: January 18, 1907. Few operas have surpassed Manon Lescaut in the depiction of the urgency of young love. The French tale of a beautiful young woman destroyed by her conflicting needs for love and luxury had already inspired Massenet’s Manon (1884), a relatively new and immensely popular work at the time of Manon Lescaut’s premiere. Puccini made the story his own and infused it with a new level of frank emotion and a flood of melody. The opera was his first great success, leading George Bernard Shaw to name him “the successor to Verdi.”

Creators

Production Sir Richard Eyre

Set Designer Rob Howell

Costume Designer Fotini Dimou

Lighting Designer Peter Mumford

Choreographer Sara Erde

Giacomo Puccini

Composer

Giacomo Puccini

Setting

The first three acts of the opera take place in various locations in France, around the year 1720: the first in the town of Amiens, the second in a magnificent palace in Paris, and the third on the waterfront of the port city of Le Havre. The fourth act is set in a desolate location in the New World, an imaginary place described in the libretto as “a vast desert near the outskirts of New Orleans.” Richard Eyre’s new production moves the action to the 1940s.